Transportation Indicators: Commuting

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Transportation Indicators: Commuting

Many regions are diversifying their transportation networks by improving transit services and coordinating investment with other infrastructure such as emerging centers, water supply, open space areas, and schools. A shift in perceptions about mobility needs is driving efforts to bring housing and jobs closer together to mitigate long commutes.

The effort to reduce daily vehicle miles traveled (DVMT) depends on planning and building a comprehensive multi-modal transportation system to strategically distribute work, personal and other trips. The effort also depends on individuals and families to adapt their lifestyles and travel behaviors to take best advantage of the system available to realize savings in fuel, emissions, time, and improving quality of life.

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Perceived change in commute times varies across the region. The use of, and preference for, commuting options is also variable.
Central Texans have access to affordable and reliable transportation alternatives that allow them to travel efficiently throughout the region.
Many regions are diversifying their transportation networks by improving transit services and coordinating investment with other infrastructure such as emerging centers, water supply, open space areas, and schools. A shift in perceptions about mobility needs is driving efforts to bring housing and jobs closer together to mitigate long commutes.
Unlinked Passenger Trips on Capital Metro. Bus Operating Expenses Per Passenger Trip.
  • U.S. Census Bureau
  • CTSIP Community Survey

Commuting Modes

  • In 2011, 75% of Central Texans commuted alone to work in their own cars, virtually unchanged over the past decade.
  • More people walk, jog, or bicycle to work than those who use public transportation to commute and the trend is slowly climbing. This can inform future decisions about infrastructure investment in “complete streets,” or neighborhoods with connected streets complete with bicycle lanes and sidewalks.

 

Average One Way Commute Time

  • For the most part commuting times have increased across Central Texas, most notably in Bastrop, Hays and Williamson Counties. Caldwell County, however, has seen a significant decrease in commuting times between 2004 and 2010.

 

Alternative Commute Modes

  • Central Texans are generally unwilling to use alternatives to driving alone, even if conditions were right for them.
  • Of several available alternative options, Central Texas commuters are most willing to use commuter rail, if conditions were right for them.
  • Over 70% of commuters are unwilling to bike or walk to work, likely a reflection of a lack of proximity to work.
  • From 2008 to 2010, willingness among Central Texans to utilize alternative travel modes for commuting decreased in all categories besides walking.
  • Reduced willingness to utilize alternative commute modes represents a disconnect with regional planning goals, which include providing more quality alternative transportation options for commuters.

 

Improvement Priorities

  • Over 60% of Central Texans consider synchronized traffic lights to be a “very important” transportation improvement.
  • More toll roads are “not at all important” for 52% of respondents.
  • Concerning other transportation improvements, less agreement can be seen among respondents, however most respondents list them as at least “somewhat important.”
By |November 18th, 2013|Categories: Research Findings, Transportation|0 Comments